When in Arbroath do as locals do and have an Arbroath Smokie with your picnic!

The new Sustrans Scotland ArtRoots funded wooden sculpture depicts East haven’s fishing heritage.

My dynamic crew like to feature local food & drink and tourism experiences as we tandem along on our adventures on a bicycle made for two! Well today was going to be one of those “must do” experiences – a mission to sample an Arboath Smokie while in Arbroath!

Yes I know its very exciting!! … but you’ll have to read on for the taste test!

Firstly I need to set the scene as the “old gal” and the “old git” had invited good solo cycling friends Gillian and Craig to Matildas Rest for an overnight stop for a good catch-up, and to join us for a Sunday cycle with their “short bikes”!

Now the bike crews may have been hoping for a long lie after a home-made curry and a few drinkies but the “old git” had everyone up sharpish – while the “old gal” offered a hearty breakfast for fuel. Fortunately the weather forecast had come up trump with the promised dry sunny day – although diplomatically no one mentioned the wind which was forecast as a “moderate breeze”!

Given that my dynamic crew decided on a repeat of our recent enjoyable and fun route, which hugs the coast from the Tay Road Bridge to Arbroath on Sustrans Scotland NCN Rt1, this was to prove significant! Brutally significant to be honest – but more of that later!

Ready to Roll – with solo cyclist friends Gillian and Craig about to tackle the Tay Road Bridge.

As the crews unpacked and set up the bikes in the car park opposite Dundee the view across the Tay offered an ideal backdrop for the inevitable series of selfie photos – before we were ready to roll! Check out the details of our route by clicking on the Strava map below.

The first part of today’s ride was a quick “downhill” pedal across the Tay Road Bridge, before heading through the port area and on up the coast. The “old git” spotted the recently installed Sustrans Scotland “high-visiblity” cycle counter as we arrived at Broughty Ferry which provides a visual counter of the number of cyclists using the route.

Sustrans says the idea behind cycle counters is to promote sustainable transport such as walking and cycling instead of driving. In general, cycle counters have been shown to be motivational for cyclists and provide data that assists planning for cycling infrastructure.

What a great idea … and Team Matilda was happy to be recorded as the 78th cyclist to be recorded that day – and number 29,256 since the counter was installed at the start of June this year. And yes we only increased the counter by one unit – not two – as it counts the bikes not the riders!

Counting bikes! – the Sustrans Scotland cyclists counter shows how busy NCN Rt1 is.

We tandemed on noting how the miles seem to pass more quickly when cycling with friends. Maybe a useful tail wind also helped … although no one was talking about that … as it was inevitable that clearly was going to provide a tough obstacle on the return journey! We soon arrived at Carnoustie which hosted the 147th The Open played over the Carnoustie links golf course in July. It has a well-deserved reputation as one of the world’s most challenging links course, and at 7,421 yards it is the longest of any of the Open venues.

Onwards we pedalled on NCN Rt 1 and it was great to see the path being so well used by bicycles on such a sunny day. Next stop was the beautiful former fishing village of East Haven which clearly has a highly active community trust called East Haven Together to protect and promote the area’s heritage and environment. And cyclists are made most welcome – with a bike friendly drinks dispensing station and route map at the entrance to the village.

Cyclists very welcome! East Haven’s bike friendly drinks dispenser and route map.

East Haven has been fortunate enough to be allocated some money from the ArtRoots fund – a community fund for artistic and aesthetic improvements to the Sustrans Scotland National Cycle Network. The result is a recently installed giant wooden sculpture depicting the area’s history as one of the oldest fishing communities in Scotland, which dates back to 1214.

The eye-catching landmark – which depicts two fishermen carved out of redwood by a chainsaw artist – has been installed on a  site overlooking the bay near the old fisherman’s shelter. Naturally my dynamic crew had to have a photo taken trying (and failing!) to subtly blend in with the sculpture!

The “old git” and “old gal” trying (and failing!) to blend in with the fishermen sculpture!

Onwards to Arbroath on the highly recommended cycle path. The harbour town was looking a its best as the sun peeked thru the clouds, giving it an almost Mediterranean feel. The area has a proud maritime and fishing history and the storm wall at Fish Quay has an RNLI memorial to the area’s “darkest day” when six lifeboatmen lost their lives when the lifeboat Robert Lindsay was overwhelmed by the sea just a quarter of a mile from the harbour back in October 1953.

The “old gal” at the RNLI memorial which stands proudly over Arbroath Harbour.

Now when in Arbroath there was clearly a requirement to do as locals do and have an Arbroath Smokie with our prosecco picnic!

The “old gal” and “old git” duly disappeared into one of several fish shops open for business and touting the authentic local delicacy of smoked haddock! And they were not disappointed. The taste test verdict was that it was remarkably fresh and just smoky enough to make it a truly mouth-watering experience. Just perfect when washed down with a glass of prosecco – with the bottle duly carried on my frame in my trendy la bouclee French-wine carrier!

Cheers! Gillian and Craig toasting the signature prosecco picnic at Arbroath …

… while the “old git” had to add the ubiquitous Arbroath Smokie to my dynamic crew’s picnic!

The Arbroath Smoke was the perfect appetizer for my dynamic crew’s picnic – lovingly prepared by the “old gal” of smoked salmon, chilli cream cheese and spinach wraps and some seasonal fresh fruit – all enjoyed overlooking the area’s impressive marina.

Me and my dynamic crew with the impressive Arbroath marina as a backdrop!

Re-fuelled and re-hydrated Gillian and Craig and my dynamic crew set off on the return journey – and all became immediately aware of the “moderate breeze”!

We stopped to admire the community garden at East Haven – complete with a decommissioned fishing boat. It is one of just five locations in Scotland to have been entered into the Britain in Bloom finals 2018 – and it is easy to see why when admiring the colourful site. Last year the area won a Beautiful Scotland Gold Award 2017 and Best Coastal Village Award.

Time for a breather! All four at the award-winning picturesque community garden at East Haven.

It would need to be said here that the pedal on the section most exposed to the sea around Carnoustie was not fun as the bikes were battered by brutal 20 mph head winds – which made for fairly slow progress. So there was a unanimous vote for another signature event of one of Team Matilda’s rides – a re-fuelling stop for carrot cake and coffee!

Except there was a devastating snag! The venue, the Glass Pavilion situated just behind Broughty Ferry beach, had run out of cakes! Never heard that one before – but it seems there had been a wedding the day before and the cafe’s supply of cakes had all been sold! What a disappointment! So the crews had to make do with a coffee without an infusion of cake!

Time for the final run back through Broughty Ferry to Dundee – where we enjoyed the protected run through the docks area. To finish it was the “uphill” crossing of the Tay Road Bridge. Now keen readers of my blog will be aware that my dynamic crew had recently broken their own record for this crossing – appropriately named as ‘The Killer Tay Bridge’ sector on Strava – getting their time down to just 6 minutes and 12 seconds.

But today the “old git” conceded that today was not a day to be breaking records – much to the relief of the “old gal”! – as Team Matilda was buffeted by strong crosswinds from the start of our pedal across the river. But kudos to my dynamic crew as we still recorded our 3rd best ever time crossing the bridge of 7 minutes 29 seconds.

Gillian and Craig had beetled off with their “short bikes” not as badly affected by the crosswinds – and they were back in the car park filming our arrival at Matilda Transport, which you can watch here.

After getting our breath back from the battle against the wind, the “old git” checked Strava which officially recorded the ride as being worthy of an incredible 33 gongs – which is almost worthy of a PB award on its own! I will say that again for effect in case you missed it – 33 gongs! There were no less than 19 personal bests; 10 second bests; and 4 third bests. Given the brutal head winds on the return journey my dynamic crew were more than happy with that outcome!

The detailed Strava figures showed my dynamic crew tandemed a distance of 38.5 miles with a moving time of 3 hours 20 minutes. The average speed was a healthy 11.6 mph (given the wind!) while the elevation was 641 feet. The maximum speed was 23.9 mph – due to no steep downhill stretches – and Team Matilda managed to burn up 1563 calories and produce an average power output of 117 W.

As always the route and pictures are brought to life in our Relive 3D video – so take a look below.

So a great sunny – if a tad windy – day for a tandem ride, which was made all the better by cycling with good friends … and sampling the Arbroath Smokie! Another grand day out really for Matildas Musings!

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City of Discovery penguins and discovering a winery on ride to Errol

Penguin spotting at Discovery Point in Dundee with RRS Discovery and the new V&A museum.

More penguin spotting … a fabulous picnic spot … and the key attraction of exploring a winery – it sounds like another perfect schedule for a Sunday #tandem ride for Team Matildas Musings!

Another day of warm sunshine and fabulous blue skies was forecast so my dynamic crew decided on a new route south from the Tay Road Bridge to Errol on  Sustrans Scotland NCN Rt1 and NCN Rt77.

“Did someone say we are visiting a winery” asked the “old gal” – trying hard not to sound too enthusiastic – as we drove to Dundee. “Yes, and you’ll get to sample their produce!” responded the “old git” before adding: “And on a day like today you will be able to close your eyes and think you are in the vineyards of France!” … Well almost!

But first there was the business of continuing our penguin hunt by p-p-p-p-icking up a penguin … or two … on the new Maggie’s Penguin Parade charity art trail of 80 giant individually designed penguins! The 5ft-tall penguins have been decorated by local artists with designs ranging from golfers to footballers and has been set up in aid of cancer charity Maggie’s.

This ride – and some of the recommended stops – recently featured in Scottish Cycling magazine – which is well worth a read. Check out the details of our route by clicking on the Strava map below.

After parking up opposite the city of Dundee we had to battle a bit of a headwind on the “downhill” crossing of the Tay Road Bridge, before taking the lift down to Discovery Point where we spotted our first penguin of the day – Fundeeland at Discovery point.

This is a real hub of the City of Discovery with the three masts of the wooden Royal Research Ship Discovery, which was captained by Robert Falcon Scott on his first journey to the Antarctic in 1902, creating an interesting old and new backdrop with the soon-to-be-opened V&A Dundee design museum which has been built to look like a giant ship.

We headed south out of Dundee along Riverside Drive at the start of the NCN Rt77 but quickly stopped at the eye-catching Yoda Pengiun – from the Star Wars movie franchise – which has been imaginatively sponsored by Specsavers!

Here I am with the eye-catching Yoda penguin – sponsored by Specsavers!

I Believe I can Fly penguin with me and the “old gal” at Dundee Airport!

We tandemed on towards Dundee Airport where the “old gal” couldn’t resist having her photo taken with I Believe I can Fly penguin – suitably painted in old-fashioned flying gear!

Into Invergowrie – passing the station – before the path comes out beside the Tay giving impressive views of the river which is some 4.5 kilometres wide at this point. Interestingly the NCN Rt77, which links Dundee with Pitlochry, is also known as the salmon run – and it was easy to see why at this point.

The spectacular Firth of Tay is 4.5 kilometres wide at this point near Invergowrie!

On out into the Carse of Gowrie – one of the country’s prime growing areas for strawberries and raspberries – where the “old git” and the “old gal” found themselves pedalling hard against that headwind. But it was a lovely relatively flat route though and the scenery is amazing. We passed the old Errol airfield before an uphill stretch into the village of Errol itself – which retains a feel from years gone past. We tandemed on for another mile to our planned picnic spot at Port Allen.

Little remains of what was once a principal local harbour in the Victorian times at Port Allen.

Although nothing but a picturesque bridge remains now, Port Allen was one of the principal local harbours in Victorian times. Given how quiet and tranquil it was on our visit, and its rural location, it is hard to imagine it as a bustling port area.

The beautiful old bridge is all that is left of any harbour area at Port Allen.

The area – known as the Tay reed beds – form the largest continuous area of reeds in the UK and are an internationally recognised habitat for breeding and overwintering birds. It certainly provided a tranquil spot for my dynamic crew to enjoy their picnic on a lovely hand crafted bench.

Ideal hand-crafted picnic bench – deep in the Carse of Gowrie by the Tay at Port Allen.

Re-fuelled by the picnic – and a bit of warm sunny relaxation – it was time to start the return journey … with the additional carrot of the visit to the winery! Tandeming back thru Errol we took a detour to the Cairn o’Mhor fruit winery. The cycle-conscious owners have even created their own cycle path off NCN Rt77 to their farm base to make it easier for visitors to get there.

That’s a big bottle! There is no doubt about the kind of operation going on at Cairn o’Mhor.

The operation has grown in recent years and now has huge vats to mature the fruit wine.

The winery has been producing its well-known brand of Scottish fruit wines since 1987 and is a key visitor attraction in the area – offering various tours and tastings. The AliBob Cafe offers a huge range of memorable treats – and of course the opportunity to sample the produce.

The “old git” and “old gal” treated themselves to sample the range of sparkling wines – including a very tasty strawberry fizz! Naturally there was also a sozzled fruit scone – with the raisins soaked in the wine before baking! And a far too tempting range of cakes – which my dynamic crew decided it would have been rude not to taste!

Fruit fizz, scones, cakes and coffee! What’s not to like?!

Having consumed far too may calories (but very enjoyably!) the “old git” upped the pace on the ride back to Dundee in a vain attempt to burn some of them off! It really was blissful tandeming in the warm sunshine, and with the wind behind us, as we pedalled across some fantastic countryside.

The scenery we tandemed past was stunning – like this impressive tree lined avenue.

We flashed thru Invergowrie and past the airport back into Dundee via Riverside Drive where we took a few minutes to stop at the impressive Tay Bridge Disaster Memorial. It is a moving tribute to the victims of the disaster back in 1879 when the central navigation spans of the Tay Bridge collapsed into the Firth of Tay, taking with them a train, 6 carriages and 75 souls to their fate.

A shot looking towards the Tay Rail Bridge – from just beside the memorial stones to the 1879 disaster.

Just time to tick off two more penguins on our pedal back to the lift onto the Tay Road Bridge. First up was Poppy the penguin and the last one of our ride was The Baltic Builder penguin – complete in Bob the Builder artwork clevery placed beside all the construction work which is being finished off near Discovery Point.

The “old gal” with Poppy the Penguin easily spotted from the cycle path.

The Baltic Builder penguin – aka Bob the Builder – with the “old git”.

The last part of our ride was the “uphill” crossing of the Tay Road Bridge – a stretch which always seems to come at the end of a long ride and therefore not one to bring shouts of enthusiasm from my dynamic crew! In truth it always seems a bit of a grind. But today the wind was blowing in the correct direction and the “old git” set the “old gal” a challenge of trying to break Team Matilda’s record for the “Killer Tay Bridge” segment of 6 minutes 46 seconds set just the week before!

And my dynamic crew were euphoric when they reached the other side of the Tay – well they would have been if they weren’t so out of puff – to discover that they had smashed their own record by over half a minute to a new Team Matilda record of 6 minutes 12 seconds. I was most impressed and am now wondering if they can beat that the next time we do this route!

After calming down and getting his breath back at Matilda Transport the “old git” checked Strava which officially recorded the ride as showing my dynamic crew tandemed a distance of 34.4 miles with a moving time of 2 hours 52 minutes. The average speed was a healthy 12 miles an hour while the elevation was 983 feet. The maximum speed was 30.9 mph and Team Matilda managed to burn up 1682 calories and produce an average power output of 146 W.

As always the route is brought to life in our Relive 3D video – so take a look below.

Again a fantastic de-stressing memorable day out and escape for my dynamic crew in glorious sunshine. I guess with the weather and the winery we really could have been tandeming on one of Team Matilda’s fabulous Tours de France …

Well almost!

Life’s a beach Superheroes and p-p-p-p-ick up the penguin trail on ride to Arbroath

It’s not everyday I get to meet up with three Superheroes at Broughty Ferry!

Meeting superheroes and penguins – well I suppose it shouldn’t surprise me as I should be well used to such strange happenings on another typical Sunday #tandem ride for Team Matildas Musings!

Sunday morning dawned with fabulous blue skies so my dynamic crew decided on a route from the Tay Road Bridge to Arbroath on Sustrans Scotland NCN Rt1.

And as an added attraction the “old git” decided that we would do some penguin spotting by p-p-p-p-icking up a penguin … or two … on the new Maggie’s Penguin Parade charity art trail and spotting some of the 80 giant individually designed penguins! 

The 5ft-tall penguins have been decorated by local artists with designs ranging from golfers to footballers and has been set up in aid of cancer charity Maggie’s.

Check out the details of our route by clicking on the Strava map below.

After parking up opposite the city of Dundee a quick “downhill” pedal took us across the Tay Road Bridge, before heading through the port area and on up the coast to Broughty Ferry. That’s where we ticked off our first penguin – appropriately called Crystal Azure given the weather conditions.

Matching outfits (nearly!) The “old gal” ticks off our first penguin – Crystal Azure at Broughty Ferry.

Just beside our first penguin photo stop, we spotted a Sustrans Scotland “high-visiblity” cycle counter which has been installed at the east end of Douglas Terrace path along the waterfront and will provide a visual counter of the number of cyclists using the route.

Sustrans says the idea behind cycle counters is to promote sustainable transport such as walking and cycling instead of driving. In general, cycle counters have been shown to be motivational for cyclists and provide data that assists planning for cycling infrastructure.

What a great idea … and Team Matilda was happy to be recorded as the 88th cyclist to be recorded that day – and number 10,721 since the counter was installed at the start of June this year. And yes we only increased the counter by one unit – not two – as it counts the bikes not the riders!

What a great idea! The Sustrans Scotland cyclists counter shows how busy NCN Rt1 is.

Tandeming past Broughty Ferry Castle my dynamic crew were somewhat surprised to be accosted by no less than three Superheroes – Hulk, Captain America and Robin – who were looking for transport to the town’s Gala Day in the adjacent park! This “old lady” was in my element as it’s not exactly an everyday occurrence to be the subject of such Superhero attention (and of course – whisper it – so was the “old gal” even tho she loyally claims the “old git” is her superhero!)

The “old gal” couldn’t fail to be impressed with her new pals – Hulk, Captain America and Robin.

Having safely delivered the Superheroes to the Gala Day – as you do! – we pedaled on to our next stop on the trail – a penguin called Sunrise who was enjoying the sunshine in Barnhill Rock Garden situated just behind the dunes of the beach.

My dynamic crew meet Sunrise penguin just behind Broughty ferry beach.

My dynamic crew tandemed on to Carnoustie where preparations were in the final stages for hosting the 147th The Open which was played over the Carnoustie links golf course in July. It has a well-deserved reputation as one of the world’s most challenging links course, and at 7,421 yards it is the longest of any of the Open venues. The course was looking resplendent in the sun and I took the opportunity of a sneeky photo in front of the area for the world’s top golfers to practice their putting. Naturally the golf course is host to a penguin – Old Tom Morris named after the legendary Scots golfer who won The Open four times back in the 1860s.

At Carnoustie Golf Links – looking resplendent in the sun ready for the 147th The Open.

The “old git” meets Old Tom Morris penguin at Carnoustie Golf Links.

Now the “old gal” and the “old git” have never progressed further than Carnoustie – despite doing this ride a few times. But today, conditions couldn’t be better and my dynamic crew decided to pedal out on the extra seven miles along NCN Rt1 to Arbroath. And what a joy that section of the cycle path was to pedal on. The harbour town was looking a its best in the bright sunshine and was busy with families enjoying the beach giving it an almost Mediterranean feel.

It was the warmest part of the day when Team Matilda arrived at the harbour area at Arbroath.

The “old gal” spotted some picnic benches on the High Common which gave a great view over the beach and sea and the perfect spot for my dynamic crew to enjoy one of their signature prosecco picnics! And I am told the fizz went down particularly well given the high temperatures!

A park bench overlooking the sea – perfect spot for my dynamic crew’s prosecco picnic!

Refuelled after a most relaxing and tasty picnic, and catching the sun’s rays, my dynamic crew set off from Arbroath on the return journey along NCN Rt1. It was great to see the path being so well used by bicycles on such a sunny day. It was a fun ride and soon we were in the beautiful former fishing village of East Haven which clearly has a highly active community trust called East Haven Together to protect and promote the area’s heritage and environment. And cyclists are made most welcome!

The “old gal” seems temporarily confused as to which bike she should be riding at East Haven!

East Haven is one of five locations in Scotland to have been entered into the Britain in Bloom finals 2018 – and it was easy for the “old git” and “old gal” to see why as they stopped to admire the colourful community gardens – complete with a fishing boat. Last year the area won a Beautiful Scotland Gold Award 2017 and Best Coastal Village Award.

The “old git” enjoying the scene in the award-winning picturesque garden at East Haven.

Back into Carnoustie and time for a photo stop by the beach – where the sea was actually blue! Quite a contrast to my dynamic crew’s last visit in March when it was not exactly sunbathing weather! In fact the “old gal” was so cold she had to wear not only her own cycling jacket, but the “old git’s” as well in a bid to try and keep warm!

The “old gal” enjoying it being a tad warmer – and less windy – than on our last visit to Carnoustie!

No such weather problems today and a glorious sunny pedal took us along the coast for another signature event of Team Matilda’s rides – a re-fuelling stop for carrot cake! The venue was the Glass Pavilion situated just behind Broughty Ferry beach.

As we stopped the “old git” discovered that he had left his cycling wallet – complete with the required cash for said carrot cake – in Matilda Transport. Fortunately the ever-resourceful “old gal” had a small amount of cash with her and they just managed to fund a cold drink each and share a portion of carrot cake! I have a feeling that the “old git” will not be allowed to forget about that one for a while!

The “old git” meets Bonnie Dundee penguin.

Back into Broughty Ferry – and the “old gal” was disappointed not to see her new Superhero friends again! But there was more penguin spotting to be done including the Bonnie Dundee one in the park. We discovered this one had actually been painted by talented artist Gail Stirling Robertson – who lives not far from Team Matilda’s home base of Auchterarder in the next village of Dunning and who is also the daughter of friends of my dynamic crew. Gail focuses on what she calls “quirky bendy art” – taking well known places and literally adding her own slant to them, while still keeping them recognizable.

The “old gal” with Penguin’s Paradise at Broughty Ferry

Capguin Scott penguin getting to know the “old git” at Brought Ferry Harbour.

After ticking another two penguins off the list – Penguin’s Paradise at Broughty Ferry Castle and Capguin Scott at the harbour – we tandemed off on the final stretch to Dundee. In the shadows of the Tay Road Bridge, near the Apex Hotel, we found the last one of our ride – called Engulfed.

The last penguin meet – Engulfed at the Apex Hotel near the Tay Road Bridge.

The last part of our ride was the “uphill” crossing of the Tay Road Bridge – which always seems a bit of a grind. Back at Matilda Transport there was time for the “old git” to check Strava which officially recorded the ride as being worthy of no less than 19 gongs – a highly pleasing 12 personal bests; 5 second bests; and 2 third bests. My dynamic crew were delighted to discover that one of the PB’s was for the “Killer Tay Bridge” segment on the return crossing with a new Team Matilda record breaking time of 6 minutes 46 seconds!

The detailed Strava figures showed my dynamic crew tandemed a distance of 38.5 miles with a moving time of 3 hours 32 minutes. The average speed was a healthy 10.9 while the elevation was 642 feet. The maximum speed was 23.9 mph and Team Matilda managed to burn up 1552 calories and produce an average power output of 109 W.

As always the route is brought to life in our Relive 3D video – so take a look below.

All in all it was a much needed day out and escape for my dynamic crew – and was certainly action packed. I really don’t think Team Matilda could have packed any more in … unless I become a Superhero bike of course! Now there’s an idea! ……..

Life’s a beach (but not sunbathing temperature!) on ride to Carnoustie

“Where’s the sun” asks the freezing “old gal” in a somewhat forlorn manner!

So after our first ride of 2018 the “Beast Fae the East” – as it was called around these parts – meant heavy snow abandoned any hopes of another outing anytime soon. Finally the weather forecasters promised some milder air and my dynamic crew decided it would be safe to venture out – if they kept to the coast. The lure of a balmy 10C and even a few rays of sun was just too tempting. After all the weather folk are never wrong … are they?!

The “old git” had selected one of my favourite routes – a 13 mile ride across the Tay Road Bridge and onto Sustrans Scotland NCR1 to Carnoustie. And the “old gal” likes it too, as it is relatively flat.

The first doubts about the weather forecast surfaced however as we pulled into the Tay Bridge car park opposite Dundee. As I was unpacked from Matilda Transport it was quite difficult to even see the bridge – despite it being so close – due to mist and low cloud.

The Tay Road Bridge is there somewhere – if you look closely thru the mist!

The omens were not looking good and the “old gal” who doesn’t do cold was already full of a feeling of foreboding. But the “old git’s” natural exuberance told her the cloud would lift and there would be sunshine by the time we got to Carnoustie! Let’s just say he was wrong!

Check out the details of our route by clicking on the Strava map below.

The first part of the trip was crossing the Tay Bridge – which carries the A92 across the Firth of Tay, and is one of the longest road bridges in Europe. On this bridge the cycle path intriguingly sits in in the middle of the two carriageways for cars, unlike most bridges where the path runs at the side of the bridge. It can be quite alarming watching lorries speeding in what seems straight for you – but you are safely boxed in behind crash barriers. Just the joggers and dog walkers to look out for!

The mist shrouded the far side before somewhat eerily the huge new V&A Museum of Design Dundee emerged from the low cloud. It is in the final stages of construction – with the building designed to look like ships. Opening later this year, it will be an international centre of design for Scotland – the first ever design museum to be built in the UK outside London.

Off the bridge and we followed the well signposted NCR1 through the Dundee port area. Emerging from the electronic gates the “old gal” was already shivering so the “old git” chivalrously offered her his cycling jacket so she had double the protection against the elements.

We pedalled on trying to work up some internal steam to fight off the bitter cold. As we tandemed round the bay the charming old fishing town of Broughty Ferry came in to view – albeit it was looking a bit damp and grey today. Passing the quaint castle we continued along a stretch of the cycle path which hugged the Blue Flag beach – which was completely deserted! Wonder why?!

The route continues to Monifieth where a new stretch of path heads over Barry Links, past a very large Ministry of Defence area on the right known as the Barry Buddon Training Centre. This has high security fencing along its perimeter and rather ominously every 100 yards or so there are warnings signs telling you to keep out as this is a live military firing area! Not surprisingly the “old gal” ordered the “old git” to pay heed to the signs and not to veer off course!

Brrr! The “old gal” trying to escape the chill for a quick picnic and welcome coffee at Carnoustie.

Another couple of miles and we reached our half way point on the ride – and our picnic destination – at Carnoustie sea front. Certainly no sunbathing for the “old gal” today as she huddled in a shelter under two jackets and warm gloves nursing a very welcome flask of coffee! The good thing was that we didn’t have to queue for a picnic bench as they were all deserted! Strange that!

Where is everyone! The picnic benches were (not surprisingly) deserted!

Despite the chilly conditions my dynamic crew bravely ate their picnic of smoked salmon and spinach wraps with and some fresh fruit. Just a shame it wasn’t a bit warmer as the view from our picnic shelter was amazing. But that sea looked icy cold!

Erm what do we do now? Here I am at the top of the bmx and skateboard track!

Our picnic spot was close to a bmx bike and skateboard track and naturally the “old git” thought this was an ideal spot for a couple of fun photos! I seriously thought he was going to take me for a ride down some of the steep slopes! As an “old lady” classic tandem I would have found that quite exhilarating! Mind you I think the “old git” was the one who was scared and decided not to risk life and limb … and my brakes! Secretly everyone was quite glad!

Personally, me thinks the “old git” was more scared than me looking at the steep slopes!

The steps at a slipway which providing another interesting photo opportunity with big waves crashing in leaving the beach almost non existent. The “old git” helpfully promised the “old gal” that they would return on a day when the sun was splitting the skies so she could soak up some rays on the sand!

It was fair to say it was bracing with the waves pounding in to Carnoustie beach!

As we tandemed back thru the car park there was a brief stop to check out the preparations for the 147th The Open which is to be played over the Carnoustie links golf course in July. It has a well-deserved reputation as one of the world’s most challenging links course, and at 7,421 yards it is the longest of any of the Open venues. The last time The Open was played at Carnoustie was in 1999 when Scots golfer Paul Lawrie lifted the famous claret jug.

The “old git” checking preparations for the 147th The Open being played over Carnoustie Links in July.

As we headed off on our 13 mile return trip it was clear lots of work is going on all over the course – and at a huge extension to the hotel overlooking the 18th green. It wll be jam packed come the week of the tournament in July.

My dynamic crew quickly got into their synchronicity factor and soon we were speeding back along the NCR1. Half way back the “old gal” made a good call for a coffee and carrot cake stop at the Glass Pavilion in Broughty Ferry.

Refuelled – and with the “old gal” having regained feeling in her feet – we tandemed back thru the dockyard before facing the final challenge of our ride – the return uphill crossing of the Tay Bridge. Into a head wind, and being cold and a bit tired from our adventure, this was a bit of a grind!

But we made it back to Matilda Transport in one piece! Back in the warmth of Matildas Rest the “old gal” immediately had a bath to defrost while the “old git” checked Strava which officially recorded the ride as being worthy of no less than 20 gongs! Amazingly we recorded a personal best for the initial crossing of the bridge covering the 1.3 miles in a time of 5 minutes and 06 seconds – it seems at an average speed of 15.7 mph. We also collected 8 2nd bests and a further 11 3rd bests! Not at all bad considering the temperature and that it was only our second outing of the year.

My dynamic crew tandemed a distance of 25.3 miles with a moving time of 2 hours 54 minutes. As always it is the smiles not the miles that count, but our average speed was 8.7 mph and the elevation was 512 feet. The maximum speed was 18.6 mph and Team Matilda managed to burn up 1,050 calories and produce an average power output of 90 W. As always the route is brought to life in our Relive 3D video – so take a look below.

So the second outing of 2018 ticked off! Both the “old gal” and the “old git” are getting a bit fed up with the cold weather. Winter can go away now – as all three of us on Team Matilda are hoping some warmer temperatures are on the way soon for sunny tandem rides!

Canter to Carnoustie across the Tay Bridge

This way for tandemers and cyclists! The “old gal” with the Tay Road bridge behind.

A rare Monday off together for my dynamic crew, and a hopeful weather forecast,  provided the perfect opportunity for a “workday” tandem trip. The “old gal” – who has an aversion to too many hills – remembered we had enjoyed a fairly flat ride on off-road cycle paths to Carnoustie last year, and recommended a repeat. The route starts near Newport on Tay and involves crossing the Tay Bridge, into Dundee and following Sustrans Scotland NCR 1 hugging the coast to the golf town of Carnoustie.

So a short 45 minute drive in Matilda Transport saw us parked up in the car park across the Tay from Dundee – which offers direct access to the bridge via a ramp. After a final weather check – and the promise of bright sunshine – we headed off. You can check out the details of our route on Strava below – and don’t forget to click on the map image to be transferred to Strava to get the full data and statistics!

The Tay Bridge carries the A92 across the Firth of Tay and at around 2,250 metres – or 1.4 miles – it is one of the longest road bridges in Europe. Opened in 1966, it celebrated its 50th anniversary last year – making it nearly as old as me, but not quite! Intriguingly the cycle path on the bridge sits in in the middle of the two carriageways for cars, unlike most bridges where the path runs at the side of the bridge. This was a bit odd to begin, creating a feeling of being boxed in and it was slightly disconcerting having the cars driving past at such speed and in close proximity. But it did actually feel very safe and we soon got into our stride.

The Tay Road Bridge celebrated its 50th anniversary last year – almost as old as me!

The water was remarkably calm and with clear skies we got a great view of the adjacent Tay Rail Bridge. Off the bridge and we followed the well signposted NCR1 along the riverbank and through the Dundee port area. You are advised that you may need photographic identification to gain access, but my crew just pressed the button and the gate opened for us!

It really is a great cycle path, and very flat, which made the “old gal” smile! And because it is a dedicated path – away from roads – it is very popular with cyclists and dog walkers, which makes for lots of sociable greetings along the way! As we tandemed round the bay the charming old fishing town of Broughty Ferry came in to view and with little effort we cycled past the castle and continued along a stretch which hugged the Blue Flag beach.

It was great path for me and my dynamic true – off road and nice long, flat straight stretches.

With the sun out, it was a joy to be tandeming in such a lovely area on such a beautiful day. The route continues to Monifieth where a new stretch of the path heads over Barry Links, past a very large Ministry of Defence area on the right known as the Barry Buddon Training Centre. This has high security fencing along its perimeter and rather ominously every 100 yards or so there are warnings signs telling you to keep out as this is a live military firing area!

The “old gal” paying attention to the warnings to keep out of the Ministry of Defence live firing range!

Not surprisingly the “old gal” ordered the “old git” to pay heed to the signs and not to veer off course! Pedalling along on the NCR1 we soon came to Carnoustie – home to the famous championship golf course which was looking at its spectacular best in the sunshine – with lots of golfers out on its links.

My dynamic crew were enjoying themselves so much that the “old gal” suggested going on the additional 7 miles to Arbroath – further up the coast for our picnic! So off we pedalled but almost as soon as we set off there was an almost instant change in the weather. The skies darkened quickly and it started to rain.

About a mile out of Carnoustie the “old git” took the executive team decision that we were going to get very wet and we turned round. We got back to Carnoustie just as a heavy downpour started – emphasising that it was the correct decision.

My crew took refuge in the cafe of the Carnoustie Leisure Centre and had a coffee while hoping the shower would pass. But the skies darkened further and the squally shower got heavier. As we were clearly cyclists sheltering from the rain, the staff took pity on us and allowed us to eat our picnic in the cafe!

Luckily we were able to use the Carnoustie Leisure Centre cafe for an indoor picnic

No prosecco this time as the “old git” thought that may be pushing the kind hospitality my crew were being offered! Lunch over and there was nothing for it but for Team Matilda to get kitted up in their rain jackets and head back to Dundee.

It would need to be said that spirits were a bit low as we headed off – with the prospect of being extremely soaked by the time we had covered the 13 miles back to Matilda Transport. But fortunately as we got to the edge of the Ministry of Defense firing range the rain stopped as quickly as it started and we could see clear sky ahead. The dark clouds started to lift as the imposing Broughty Ferry Castle came into view, and decided to risk a stop for a photo.

Here I am posing with the “old gal” at the imposing Broughty Ferry Castle.

And as the storm clouds blew away the sea suddenly became calmer again and my dynamic crew were once again enjoying our tandem ride. We had another quick stop at a nature corner outlining the area’s wildlife, highlighted by an impressive sculpture to represent bird feathers.

A sculpture of bird feathers on the way back to Dundee.

We continued along the route with the sun back out to play, tandeming back through the dockyard to the bridge. Just beside the bridge there is a massive construction sight where the huge new V&A Museum of Design Dundee is taking shape – with the building designed to look like ships. When it opens in 2018 it will be an international centre of design for Scotland – the first ever design museum to be built in the UK outside London.

The ship like design of the new V&A Museum of Design Dundee is now starting to take shape.

After checking out the museum it was time for the return crossing across the Tay Bridge – but firstly we encountered the rather unusual way of accessing the bridge and staying on NCR1 – a lift! But fortunately it is very easy to use. I was thinking that I would have to be lifted unceremoniously into the lift at an awkward angle as there would probably be only room lengthwise for single bikes – but I am delighted to report I could simply be pushed in.

Going up! Unusual way of accessing the Tay Bridge on NCR1 – but happily it was a long lift!

Emerging from the lift and rejoining the cycle path there is a great view from above of the new V&A museum. It certainly looks very impressive even at this early stage of construction.

A view of the new V & A Museum from the Tay Bridge.

The “old git” was waffling on about breaking another record on the way back across the bridge – but the “old gal” was quick to point out that it was in fact an uphill pedal on the return trip! The “old git” scoffed, but quickly discovered the truth as they pedalled off and were suddenly hit by a head wind!

What should have been a quick cycle back across the bridge turned into a bit of a grind – before Team Matilda were back in the car park across from Dundee. A reviving cup of coffee was required, but the the “old git” and the “old gal” were euphoric when they checked Strava to find they had gained no less than 23 gongs – 14 personal bests and 9 second best times! Mind you this was probably mainly due to keeping pedalling at a fair speed to beat the showers, but also underlines that my dynamic crew are a good bit fitter and stronger than they think!

Strava officially recorded the ride as Team Matilda covering a distance of  27.9 miles with a total moving time of 3 hours 06 minutes – giving an average speed of 9.0 mph.

The total elapsed time was just 4 hours 13 minutes – allowing for sheltering from the rain! Top speed recorded was just 19.0 mph given the flatness of the route, with the elevation covered being just 164 feet. Together we managed to burn up 1,343 calories, and produced an estimated average power output of 108 W.

Regular readers of my blog will know only too well by now that the “old git” has found a clever new app called Relive which creates a nifty 3D video interpretation of our rides – effectively bringing Strava to life. So take a look at the video of our route below. (Remember if you are reading this on email, you need to click on the blog first – via the link at the bottom of the email – to view the video.)

The overall verdict from my dynamic crew was that it was brilliant way to record another 28 miles on a rare weekday off for my crew, which left them feeling righteous! Add to that lots of laughs and the fact that we managed to dodge the showers and it was a win, win situation!

Great preparation for my Tour de Deux Festivals du Tandem this weekend….

Tay Bridge to Carnoustie on the Ooor Wullie Bucket Trail … and Tour de Perthshire getting close!

On the cycle path at the Tay Bridge which intriguingly sits in the middle of the two carriageways for cars.

The Tay Bridge cycle path sits in the middle of the two car carriageways.

After last Sunday’s hilly and wet ride at Loch Katrine, the “old gal” had a simple request when planning this weekend’s ride. “Can we do a flat ride in the dry?” she begged! Well good that the “old git” is, he hasn’t (yet!) perfected the art of being able to control the weather -but he did graciously concede to planning a ride which didn’t involve any King of the Mountains tandeming!

We had been recommended to a route which starts at Newport on Tay and involves crossing the Tay Bridge, into Dundee and following National Cycle Network Route (NCR)1 up the east coast to Carnoustie – a perfectly manageable distance of 13 miles. And it was showing almost totally flat – with the only real elevation getting onto the bridge! When the “old gal” saw this she was ecstatic and happily agreed.

Therefore on Sunday morning we were all in good spirits as we drove away from Matildas Rest – with the added bonus of some bright sunshine making an appearance! A 45 minute drive in Matilda Transporter saw us parked up in the car park across the Tay from Dundee, which had direct access to NCR 1 via a ramp. You can check out the route of our Tay bridge to Carnoustie ride on Strava below – and don’t forget to click on the map image to get the full date and statistics!

ATB Tay Bridge StravaThe Tay Bridge carries the A92 across the Firth of Tay and at around 2,250 metres – or 1.4 miles – it is one of the longest road bridges in Europe. Opened in 1966, it celebrates its 50th anniversary later this month. Intriguingly the cycle path on the bridge sits in in the middle of the two carriageways for cars, unlike most bridges where the path runs at the side of the bridge. This was a bit odd to begin, creating a feeling of being boxed in and it was slightly disconcerting the cars driving past at such speed and in close proximity. But it did actually feel very safe and we soon got into our stride.

The "old gal" taking in the views on the Tay Bridge with Newport on Tay behind her.

The “old gal” taking in the views on the Tay Bridge with Newport on Tay behind her.

It was fairly breezy on the bridge but with the clear skies we got a good view of the adjacent Tay Rail Bridge.  The windy conditions allowed for a good practice of my dynamic duo’s latest gizmo – walkie talkies! Now why do you need walkie talkies when you are both on the same bike I hear you ask – and that would normally be a very sensible question! But there is a good answer. You see the “old git” – because (whisper it!) is getting on in years his hearing is not what it used to be! And that has left the “old gal” becoming increasingly frustrated as she has been having to shout things usually three times before she is heard. And if the message is “truck behind” it is usually too late by the time the message is understood!

So to avoid catastrophic consequences (and to ease the “old gal’s” blood pressure”!) they invested in a set of voice activated walkie talkies with earpieces which worked a treat and means they can actually communicate with each other! And I have to say it is an improvement – even if it does leave my crew looking like two FBI secret service agents!

Off the bridge and we followed the well signposted NCR1 along the river bank and then through the Dundee port area. You are advised that you may need photographic identification for this part of the cycle path, but  we just pressed the button on the gate and it opened for us!

It really is a great cycle path – and as flat as promised. And because it is a dedicated path – away from roads – it is very popular which makes for lots of sociable greetings along the way! As we tandemed round the bay the charming old fishing town of Broughty Ferry came in to view and with little effort we cycled past the castle and continued along a stretch which hugged the Blue Flag beach.

With the sun out, it was a joy to be tandeming in such a lovely area on such a beautiful day. The route continues to Monifeith where a new stretch of the path heads over Barry Links, past a very large Ministry of Defence area on the right – and kept well secret – known as the Barry Buddon Training Centre. This has high security fencing along its perimeter and rather ominously every 100 yards or so there are warnings signs telling you to keep out as this is a live military firing area!

Danger! No entry! The "old gal" emphasises the warning signs at the live firing area.

Danger! No entry! The “old gal” emphasises the warning signs at the live firing area.

Not surprisingly the “old gal” ordered the “old git” to pay heed to the signs and not to veer off course! Instead we headed along the NCR1 to Carnoustie – home to the famous championship golf course which was looking at its spectacular best today in the sunshine. The path took us along the sea front and we found a nice bench in an alcove for a lunch stop, which protected us from the sea breeze.

Now it has been mentioned in passing that perhaps Team Matilda were perhaps over indulging in the calories with our famous prosecco picnic lunches! To be honest, my dynamic crew put that down to envy! But in deference to those claims, my crew decided to set up a parsimonious prosecco picnic for  a giggle.

The parsimonious prosecco picnic - just a giggle to show what slim pickings would look like!

The parsimonious prosecco picnic – just a giggle to show what slim pickings would look like!

After that the rest of the grand Sunday prosecco picnic was unloaded from the cool bag. Today’s menu was croissants filled with smoked salmon and chilli flavoured cream cheese, a few mini pork pies and some jarlsberg cheese, followed by a healthy fruit salad, and of course the key ingredient – the nicely chilled small bottles of prosecco.

The real version of my dynamic duo's picnic - with everything in tandem, naturally!

The real version of my dynamic duo’s picnic – with everything in tandem, naturally!

I have to say I was feeling very glamorous with the sun shining on my frame – looking every inch a classic tandem today! And I have been basking in the adoration of passers by today as would you believe that during the day no less than five different people  came up to my dynamic crew and wanted to chat about the tandem and my history. Phrases such as “lovely bike” and “beautiful condition” and “lovely paint job” were being banded about as well as questions about how easy (or difficult) I was to ride! But the “old gal” expertly fielded all questions and obviously said I was a joy to ride! Apart from the weight of my steel frame going up hills, that is! It was all going to my head a bit, and the “old git” just added to that  feeling when he told me that a fellow member of the Tandem Club UK had described me during a discussion about Jack Taylor tandems as “a work of art”! Well as we all know, it is nice to be recognised!

So after lunch we headed off on the return journey – managing to run the gauntlet of the golf courses and the military firing range without incident! We pulled up and had a nice coffee and slice of chocolate and ginger cake at the lovely looking Tayberry restaurant in Broughty Ferry, with my dynamic crew making a mental note to return for a meal.

You know my crew really shouldn’t be let out alone as the “old git” decided to have some fun on the walkie talkies when the “old gal” went to the loo, and suddenly found herself listening to the “old git” whispering sweet nothings in her ear! Oh how he laughed! Let’s just say the “old gal” wasn’t quite so impressed!

As we cycled on we passed the first of several pieces of artwork themed on the famous Oor Wullie cartoon character – complete with the bucket he sits on – from the Sunday Post newspaper. This one was brightly coloured in purple, and on closer examination the “old git” discovered it was called Dreamland Wullie and that it was part of a newly created Oor Wullie Bucket Trail which has been set up in and around Dundee.

The "old gal" with Dreamland Wullie - part of the Oor Wullie Bucket Trail!

The “old gal” with Dreamland Wullie – part of the Oor Wullie Bucket Trail!

The trail is a huge public art event running to 27 August, featuring 55 5ft tall sculptures of Oor Wullie sitting on his bucket, all individually sponsored and decorated by artists/designers located in and around the city for the public to view, share and adore. Trail maps and a digital app are available to enable the folks of Dundee and visitors to go out and find all 55 sculptures and to strike them off their ‘bucket’ list.  Then at the end of the summer the statues will all be auctioned off with proceeds going to the Archie Foundation’s appeal for a new twin operating theatre pediatric surgical suite for Tayside Children’s Hospital.

Pedalling on we passed the beach. During a particularly narrow stretch along what was not much wider than the beach wall, the “old git” decided it would be a good idea to do a selfie video to show the problems we can encounter when trying to dodge wayward pedestrians, prams and dogs – who all believe they have a much greater right to use any shared paths than this “old lady” tandem does! As you will see the most often repeated phrase is “excuse me!” And if you listen carefully you will hear my horn being parped! (Remember if you are reading this on email, you need to click on the blog first – via the link at the bottom of the email – to view the video.)

After negotiating the selfie video shoot next stop was Broughty Ferry Castle where we found another Oor Wullie, proudly sitting against the backdrop of the castle. This one was called Rain Song Wullie, and was a good match for my dynamic duo’s saltire cycling tops.

Who needs Pokemon Go when you can have this much fun on the Oor Wullie Bucket trail!

Who needs Pokemon Go when you can have this much fun on the Oor Wullie Bucket trail!

Now as you know every proper castle has to have a drawbridge. And of course I had never been on a drawbridge before so the “old git” duly obliged by pushing me up the steep rampart so I could imposingly pose for a picture, much to the amusement (that should really be bemusement!) of visitors to the castle.

Posing with the "old git" on the drawbridge at Broughty Ferry Castle.

Posing with the “old git” on the drawbridge at Broughty Ferry Castle.

We could see another Oor Wullie on the harbour wall and this one was cleverly themed as Oor Lifesaver – decorated in full RNLI gear as it was placed just yards away from the local lifeboat.

Oor Lifesaver Wullie, positioned near the RNLI station at Broughty Ferry.

Oor Lifesaver Wullie, positioned near the RNLI station at Broughty Ferry.

We continued along the route, back through the dockyard’s electronic gates, emerging on the other side to one of the most colourful Oor Wullies, called Glow Wullie.

Selfie time! The "old gal" and the "old git" at Glow Wullie near the waterfront at Dundee.

Selfie time! Glow Wullie with the “old gal” and the “old git” near the waterfront at Dundee.

With four Oor Wullies collected my dynamic crew decided that was enough – but it’s a great idea and had clearly brought lots of families out walking on the streets to let children tick them off.

Time for the return crossing across the Tay Bridge and we had to get the lift back up to the cycle path level. And the “old git” got the “old gal” to record my first (well second obviously, as I had to go down in the lift earlier – but who is arguing!) trip on a lift to show how easy it is to use. I was thinking I would have to be lifted unceremoniously into the lift at an angle as there would probably be only length for single bikes – but I was delighted to say I could simply be pushed in. Have a laugh at the “old git” doing his tour guide bit! (And don’t forget that if you are reading this on email, that you need to click onto the blog to watch the video.)

A quick cycle back across the bridge and we were soon back in the car park at the other side of the bridge – just in time to toast a great ride with a cooling soft drink, while checking up on Strava. It officially recorded the ride as covering a distance of 26.5 miles with a moving time of 3 hours 25 minutes, with an average speed of 7.8 mph. The plus point was that the elevation covered was just 374 feet – and most of that was going up and down to the Tay Bridge! Top speed was 32.4 mph – and we even managed to burn up 1,632 calories and produce an estimated average power output of 119 W. Another fabulous ride and a great day had by all!

So on the way back to Matildas Rest thoughts turned to France – and amazingly there are now just six weeks left till the Grand Depart for  Le Tour de Loire Valley in mid September  which will see my dynamic duo having to pedal me nearly 230 miles while through the world-famous vineyards and stunning chateaux of the region.

This will be the third annual Tour de France holiday for Team Tandem Ecosse (Team Matilda’s name for foreign holidays!) – following in the footsteps of amazing tours of Burgundy in 2014 and Bordeaux in 2015. (If you want to read my Musings of those wonderful trips – just type Burgundy or Bordeaux into the ‘Search Matildas Musings’ box  and you will see the postings.)

The logo for Le Tour de Perthshire.

The logo for Le Tour de Perthshire.

But before then – in just two weeks time my dynamic duo are hosting two fellow tandemers, Jane and John Taylor who live near Southampton in Hampshire, on Le Tour de Perthshire.

Yes I am so excited as they are bringing their Pino semi-recumbent tandem called Bluebird  – who has her own mini blog-style ‘Travels with Bluebird’ Facebook page – to stay in Perthshire for a week.

The “old git” and the “old gal” have become friends with Bluebird’s crew after starting to chat on social networks including The Tandem Club UK Facebook page. And, what’s more, I understand they are avid fans of my blog – so they must be good people!

Jane and John certainly seem to have much in common with my crew – such as not enjoying hills and definitely enjoying wine!

In fact the quartet seem to have the same views on not taking tandeming too seriously – including decorating Bluebird with Christmas lights then sitting in the garage with a glass of wine to take a photograph – that they have decided that they are the founder members of the self-created Nutty Tandemers Club!

John and Jane showing they are founding members of the self-created Nutty Tandemers Club!

John and Jane showing they are founding members of the Nutty Tandemers Club!

So the plan is that me and Bluebird – accompanied by our crews, obviously! – will be going out for some of the most scenic rides around my area, including the likes of Loch Rannoch and Loch Katrine. My dynamic duo have even arranged for a couple of days off work to be local tour guides for Le Tour de Perthshire!

This “old lady” is certainly looking forward to having a tandem pal for some ride outs. I am sure Bluebird and I can get up to mischief while the two tandem crews are indulging in those famous prosecco picnics or when we stop at local hostelries!

I mean the crews of Team Matilda and Team Bluebird clearly think they are the ones going to be enjoying themselves – but us tandems are going to have brilliant time together.

Meantime Jane and John have sent a contribution to my blog explaining a bit about themselves and the forthcoming Tour de Perthshire:

“So, the much awaited Tour de Perthshire will soon be upon us and The Nutty Tandemers Club will ride forth for the first time.

The southern contingent – aka Team Bluebird – has been out and about all over the place, near and far, riding a variety of terrains so hopefully Perthshire won’t throw anything unexpected our way.

Team Bluebird out and about at Milford on Sea in Hampshire.

Team Bluebird out and about on a ride at Milford on Sea in Hampshire.

We do know it’s a beautiful area having ridden through parts of it on a few different trips in recent years – but we know we are going to see so much more with your suggestions and your company Matilda. And Bluebird says she is eagerly anticipating meeting up with you too.

Since last September we have ridden Scottish hills, Holland and Belgium’s flat land, and tracks and roads in quite a few English counties so we hope we have covered all eventualities.

Despite all our endeavours – like Team Matilda – climbing hills has never got any easier! We get up them, not many defeat us, but it’s a slow process! But does that matter? Of course not, because we aren’t in a race.

I am glad to say we have similar attitudes to tandeming as Team Matilda –  we go out on Bluebird to enjoy the ride, look at the views, smell the fresh air and feel at one with the world.

Team Bluebird on a picnic minus prosecco - this will change on Le Tour de Perthshire!

Team Bluebird on a picnic minus prosecco – this will change on Le Tour de Perthshire!

Oh and one final thing, we are looking forward to sampling those famous prosecco picnics of yours Matilda!

Cheers and here’s to a very successful Tour de Perthshire!

Jane and John

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