Out of hibernation on a rusty flutter to Forteviot

The new stone in Forteviot is inspired by the strong Pictish culture and the Dupplin Cross.

My dynamic crew decided they could wait no longer for the temperature to start rising. And much as the “old gal” likes some warmth, there was a resounding acceptance that Team Matilda had to emerge from their winter hibernation before rust and inactivity seized up all our joints!

Our last outing was just over two months ago – back before Christmas, with a short ride to Carols at Tullibardine Chapel. So, with the weather forecast giving dire warnings of the Beast from the East blasting freezing temperatures and lots of snow at the start of the week, the “old git” decided it was a case of now or never!

Ready to roll for 2018! Emerging from my garage at Matildas Rest!

My crew wakened to bright sunshine but the temperature was still stuck on zero as they fuelled up with a hearty but healthy breakfast. Next task was getting kitted up in multiple layers of winter cycling gear before I finally emerged out of my comfy garage at Matildas Rest for the first time in 2018.

After the “old gal” in her role as “chief mechanic” gave me the once over to check all my bits were lubricated and in working order, we headed off.

The “old gal” – half of my dynamic crew – wrapped up against the elements!

The “old git” had chosen a run that would be a pedal around Pictish Perthshire – heading towards the historic nearby villages of Dunning and then on to Forteviot, covering a distance of just under 16 miles with a few hills thrown in to test their fitness after a long lay off.

Check out the details of our route by clicking on the Strava map below.

With the sun on our faces my dynamic crew tentatively pedalled off into the glorious Perthshire countryside towards Dunning. Despite initially feeling like tandem novices all three of us were quickly back into the way of it.

It probably helped that the first stretch involves a steep downhill which saw us record a speed of  just over 25 mph within the first three minutes of leaving Matildas Rest! Let’s just say that speed wasn’t beaten for the rest of the ride.

But the synchronicity factor of the “old git” and the “old gal” soon kicked in and we quickly picked up some speed, with all three of us perfectly in tune! It was great to be back out and feel the fresh air between my spokes on the quiet country roads of Perthshire – which are great for tandeming and cycling, as shown by the number of bikes we saw while out on our ride.

“This is the kind of tandeming I like” exclaimed the “old gal” as my crew pedalled along feeling very pleased with themselves. In what seemed like no time at all we tandemed into Forteviot – an ancient Pictish capital of Scotland, where King Kenneth MacAlpin died in the 9th Century.

We had travelled the near 8 miles in 50 minutes – which wasn’t too bad considering it was our first ride of the year – and the village was looking its usual pretty self in the sunshine. The village “square” (or green to be exact!) has some very quaint houses which were rebuilt for workers of the Dupplin Estate in 1927 and are create a lovely focal point for the village.

Time for a welcome cup of hot coffee for my dynamic crew at the new Forteviot stone.

As my crew enjoyed a cup of hot coffee – which the “old gal” had thoughtfully added to a flask before departure – they discovered a fabulous new centrepiece to the village since Team Matildas last visit.

A new carved stone now stands proudly – inspired by the strong Pictish culture and the historic Dupplin Cross. The original rare 3m high cross, carved out of sandstone in around AD800, once stood in the palace of the Pictish Kings at Forteviot. It is now housed in the nearby St Serf’s Church in Dunning and looked after by Historic Environment Scotland.

There is no plaque in place as yet to tell you about it, but a chat with some locals saw my dynamic crew discover it is called Set in Stone – the Birth of Alba and is a new Pictish stone celebrating Forteviot’s important role in the birth of medieval Scotland.

The new stone carving – which is sensitively floodlit at night – is part of the Heritage Lottery funded Pictish Stones project run by the Tay Landscape Partnership to provide the area with a key legacy monument marking the kingdom that became Scotland. The new contemporary Pictish sculpture is being formally unveiled on Saturday 17 March at 12 noon.

The “old git” in his not remotely colour coordinated winter kit! But he wasn’t cold!

While enjoying the warmth of the coffee the “old gal” noticed that the old green wooden bus shelter was being rebuilt – and went over to speak to the workman who was cutting and sawing wood. This turned out to be local forester Jim Thomson who runs his own Woodland Craft business.

Forester Jim Thomson is building a new bus shelter as part of the Tay Landscape Partnership project.

Jim has been contracted to build a new eco-friendly bus shelter in Forteviot as part of the Tay Landscape Partnership funding for the area. It was certainly one of the best built bus shelters my crew had seen!

The new environmentally friendly wooden bus shelter taking shape in Forteviot.

It was great to see such activity in the village – which will hopefully provide a flow of visitors keen to find out more about the Pictish history of the area.

Bidding farewell to Jim, and before we got too cold, we headed back on our return journey – passing another historical site worth visiting in the village – Forteviot Church of St Andrew where archaeological studies indicate that Christians were first buried in the graveyard in the 6th century.

My dynamic crew pedalled furiously to create some heat – and were in buoyant mood as they discovered that there was (for once!) no headwind to battle. Despite a few hills climbing out of Forteviot we were soon tandeming into Dunning – a village which is also rich in history having been burned to the ground during the 1715 Jacobite Rebellion.

Here I am parked up outside the Kirkstyle Inn in Dunning – need a loo stop they said!

It is also boasts a great friendly country pub called The Kirkstyle Inn which my dynamic crew have been known to visit from time to time! It provided the ideal place for a loo stop – which the “old gal” then decided would be a good spot for a small libation to fuel up for the final miles home! After all it would have been rude not to!

The “old gal” decided a small libation would help the ride home!

So after a lovely Scottish artisan gin, it was time for the last four miles home. Gosh it had suddenly turned a good bit colder – wonder if that was anything to do with the cosy pub and the gin!? Surely not! We pedalled off quickly and didn’t stop at the the last piece of local history on today’s trip – the monument to Maggie Wall. This is an eerie stone cross with a hand painted date of 1657 and it is said to be a memorial to the last witch to be burned at the stake.

The return trip to Matildas Rest took just 10 minutes longer than the outward journey – which given the hills and my crew’s rustiness is a commendable effort. While having another warming cup of coffee the “old git” checked Strava which officially recorded the ride as being worthy of 2 gongs … amazingly we recorded a personal best and a 3rd best.

My dynamic crew tandemed a distance of 15.7 miles with a moving time of 1 hour 51 minutes. As always it is the smiles not the miles that count, but our average speed was 8.5 mph and the elevation was 633 feet. The maximum speed was 25.7 mph and Team Matilda managed to burn up 801 calories and produce an average power output of 108 W. As always the route is brought to life in our Relive 3D video – so take a look below.

So the first outing of 2018 now ticked off! Both the “old gal” and the “old git” are hoping some warmer weather is on its way soon for sunny tandem rides!

Brr! the “old gal” shivering on return … hoping for sunnier tandem days ahead!

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What a difference 180 degrees makes on Forteviot flutter

The "old gal" basking in the Spring sunshine at the bus shelter at Forteviot.

The “old gal” basking in the Spring sunshine at the bus shelter at Forteviot.

You’ve heard the old cliche about a football match being “a game of two halves” – well our latest tandem adventure falls firmly into the camp of being “a ride of two halves”! And it truly underlines just what a difference 180 degrees can make when out tandeming!

Back to the start and Sunday was the day Spring was due to start in Perthshire and for once the weather matched the forecast and we awakened to bright sunshine at Matildas Rest. My crew were in happy mood as we had a hearty but healthy breakfast – within the guidelines of the Hay Eating Plan – before we all got kitted up and headed out into beautifully sunny Perthshire’s countryside.

The “old git” had chosen a run that would be a pedal around Pictish Perthshire – heading towards the historic nearby villages of Dunning and Forteviot, covering a distance of around 16 miles with a few hills thrown in to test our new found fitness! You can check out the details of our route on Strava below – and don’t forget to click on the map image to get the full data and statistics! 

wad-strava-mapWith the sun at our backs my dynamic crew pedalled off towards Dunning, before heading further out into the glorious Perthshire countryside – enjoying deep breaths of the fresh air. Everyone was feeling very healthy and – even tho I say so myself – this “old lady” was fairly flying along. the synchronicity factor of the “old git” and the “old gal” was really high and all three of us were perfectly in tune!

“This is the kind of tandeming I like” exclaimed the “old gal as we raced along feeling very pleased with ourselves. In what seemed like no time at all we tandemed into Forteviot – an ancient Pictish capital of Scotland, where King Kenneth MacAlpin died in the 9th Century.

Bright sunshine and the first shoots of Spring with pretty snowdrops greeted us at Forteviot.

Bright sunshine and the first shoots of Spring with pretty snowdrops greeted us at Forteviot.

We had travelled the near 8 miles in an impressive 33 minutes, and the village was looking very pretty in the sunshine. The village “square” has some very quaint houses which were rebuilt for workers of the Dupplin Estate in 1927 and are create a lovely focal point for the village.

The village "square" in Forteviot is a real focal point - especially in the sunshine!

The village “square” in Forteviot is a real focal point – especially in the sunshine!

The sun was actually warm on the skin and was a welcome change to the near Arctic conditions we had faced on our recent tandem rides. The “old gal” basked in the sunshine in the quaint wooden bust shelter in the middle of the village, before checking out some snowdrops.

The sunshine had my crew in buoyant mood with plenty of laughs!

The sunshine had my crew in buoyant mood with plenty of laughs!

Another historical site worth visiting in the village is Forteviot Church of St Andrew where archaeological studies indicate that Christians were first buried in the graveyard in the 6th century.

My dynamic crew were in buoyant fun-filled mood and all was good with the world! At least it was till we headed back on the return journey. As soon as we left Forteviot Team Matilda realised that the wind had got up – and it was blasting directly into the “old git’s” face!

It was like cycling on sand as we pedalled into wind which was much stronger than a flutter! A check on the weather later confirmed that we were fighting against gust of around 30mph at one one stage!

On we battled back into Dunning stopping to get our breath back in the village which also has a history – being burned to the ground during the 1715 Jacobite Rebellion. The oldest house remaining dates from 1730. It is well worth a stop at St Serf’s Church too, where the bell tower dates from around 1200. It is no longer used as a church and belongs to Historic Scotland as it houses the Dupplin Cross. This rare 3m high cross, carved out of sandstone in around AD800, once stood in the palace of the Pictish Kings at Forteviot.

There was time for a quick photo of me with my new natty new waterproof saddle covers that I was sent by my pals at Sustrans Scotland.

My natty waterproof saddle covers - a lovely gift from Sustrans Scotland.

My natty waterproof saddle covers – a lovely gift from Sustrans Scotland.

The last 5 miles seemed very long as the wind continued to blast. We didn’t stop at the last piece of local history on today’s trip – the monument to Maggie Wall. This is an eerie stone cross with a hand painted date of 1657 and it is said to be a memorial to the last witch to be burned at the stake.

After a gargantuan effort we finally made it back! Let’s just say that those 180 degrees made a massive difference to our performance. Battling against the wind it took us an incredible 59 minutes – almost double the outbound time – to grind out the 8 miles back to Matildas Rest.

Strava officially recorded the ride as covering a distance of  15.6 miles with a total moving time of  1 hour 32 minutes, at an average speed of 10.2 mph – which was not too bad considering the wind factor on the return journey!

The total elapsed time was just 1 hour 46 minutes – the difference accounted for by a quick photo stop! Top speed was 27.1 mph and the elevation covered was 425 feet. Together we managed to burn up 837 calories, and produced an estimated average power output of 136 W.

So all in all a good outing – a fantastic first half of trip, with a more challenging second half! But – despite the wind – the great thing is that Spring looks like it has finally Sprung!

So here’s to more sunny rides! And clearly #perthistheplace!